The US between al-Qaeda and the Islamic State: Is it Possible that Washington Will Back al-Qaeda

 

The Saudi ASharq al-Awsat newspaper last month published a supplement entitled the Entanglements of Terror. In it, Saudi researchers and others try to sketch out the characteristics of the Islamist terror organizations and the phenomenon of the so-called modern Islamist terrorism in the region. The leader of the Islamic State (IS), Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, seeks to establish camps around the Middle East and the whole world. His main target is Arab regimes and states. It is clear that expansion in Iraq and Syria will be accompanied by terrorist activities in other Arab countries to enlist more supporters for al-Baghdadi to establish movements. Analyses show that the difference in strategies between IS and al-Qaeda is that Western countries are not a top priority for IS, at least for now. It seems that differences between these terrorist organizations are ideological. For instance, the edict by Abu Muhammad al-Maqdisi, the spiritual mentor of Jordan’s Salafist movement, in which he has forbidden Islamist organizations from pledging allegiance to IS. He has sent a cable to Islamist groups fighting in Syria and warned them against killing Muslims. Based on this dispute, one wonders about a term in use now, “moderate rebel groups”, which receive military support by the American administration. In the future, Washington might consider offshoots of al-Qaeda as moderate groups compared to IS. Source:By Zvi Bar'el

Image Source: Reuters Pictures

 
 

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